In many cases, the biggest hurdle for kids who are just starting out learning to play a new bass guitar is how heavy the guitars are. Parents buying a bass guitar for their child might find that they’ll do much better with a bass that’s ¾ the size of a regular bass. Fortunately, there are so many options out there that you’ll be able to find one your kid will love no matter what.

Here are five of the best kids’ bass guitars. These guitars are all ¾ the size of a standard bass, the perfect size for little hands.

What Are The Best Kids Bass Guitars With 3/4 Sizes?

IMAGERECOMMENDED PRODUCTSPRODUCTFEATURES
  • Slim maple neck and compact poplar body
  • 28.6" long neck, ¾ the size of a standard
  • P and J pickups with one split-coil
  • Flat walnut neck for easy fret accessibility
  • Lightweight basswood body
  • Sonically and visually striking
  • Double-horn silhouette
  • Chrome knobs and synthetic bone nuts
  • 28.6" long neck
  • Vintage design
  • Poplar body, maple neck, & jatoba fingerboard
  • 30" neck with 20 frets
  • Magnetic Field Design humbucking pickup
  • Unique pick plate and vintage style
  • 30" neck that's perfect for older kids

Kids Bass Guitars Reviews

Ibanez miKro GSRM20 Bass Guitar

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  • Slim maple neck and compact poplar body
  • 28.6" long neck, ¾ the size of a standard
  • P and J pickups with one split-coil
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Ibanez miKro GSRM20 Bass Guitar Review

Ibanez basses are popular among players of all ages and are extremely affordable even at their full size. With a slim neck and a compact body, it’s not only much lighter to hold, but it’ll be much easier for small fingers to play the right notes.

It’s constructed from a poplar body and a maple neck, so the materials putting it together are just as high-quality as other Ibanez basses. The neck is 28.6″ long, six inches shorter than the standard 34″ on regular bass guitars, but it still has 22 frets. You’re not sacrificing any notes by buying a shorter bass.

If you’re looking for a kids’ bass that still has great tone, don’t worry: the Ibanez miKro GSRM20 supports great low-end and has standard P and J pickups for a crunchy, punchy tone.

Pros

  • Full 22 frets so you can play the same notes as on a full-sized bass.
  • Great low-end for a small-scale bass.
  • One of the cheapest kids' basses listed here.

Cons

  • Fairly basic, no-frills bass model.

Gretsch G2220 Junior Jet Bass II

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  • Flat walnut neck for easy fret accessibility
  • Lightweight basswood body
  • Sonically and visually striking
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Gretsch G2220 Junior Jet Bass II Review

With a light basswood body, the Gretsch G2220 Junior produces a detailed sound that you might not expect from a kids’ bass guitar! The walnut fretboard is built to be flatter, so your child will have an easier time reaching the frets and getting clear, ringing notes.

Unlike the other basses listed here, the G2220 uses two humbucker pickups rather than split- or single-coil pickups. Humbuckers “buck” the hum that sometimes can occur in the signal chain that transfers the noise from your bass to your amp. They also will make your sound much more deep and resonant.

The G2220 has a 30.3″ neck length, so it’s still a little longer than many of the other basses listed here, but compared to the standard 34″ bass necks, you’ll still have much more mobility.

Pros

  • Humbucker pickups that take the buzz out of your sound.
  • Clarifying sound from the basswood body.
  • Slightly "looser" strings than some other bass guitars, making it perfect for slap-style technique.

Cons

  • 30" neck instead of 28" neck.

Squier Mini Precision Bass Electric Bass

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  • Double-horn silhouette
  • Chrome knobs and synthetic bone nuts
  • 28.6" long neck
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Squier Mini Precision Bass Electric Bass Review

For kids who’d rather have a Stratocaster-inspired bass, the Squier Mini Precision Bass has that distinctive double-horn silhouette made famous by Fender. It’s a shorter version of their full-sized Precision Bass but designed for little hands.

The Squier bass also uses a split single-coil pickup, so you can alter how resonant the sound of your bass is—you can bring your sound to the forefront or take it back and support the rest of your band.

Unlike the miKro GSRM20, Mini Precision Bass has no plastic parts attached, making it slightly higher quality. Instead, you have chrome knobs and nuts made of synthetic bone. It’s still one of the most affordable basses here, so if your child is looking for a great bass with lots of style, you won’t have to spend tons of money.

Pros

  • Split single-coil pickup to quickly switch the tone of your instrument.
  • Comfortable to hold, easy to access every fret.
  • More affordable than other ¾ bass guitars.

Cons

  • Only 20 frets, two less than on a standard size bass.
  • Only two tone-control knobs instead of three.

Ibanez TMB30 Bass Guitar

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  • Vintage design
  • Poplar body, maple neck, & jatoba fingerboard
  • 30" neck with 20 frets
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Ibanez TMB30 Bass Guitar Review

This mini bass guitar is also from Ibanez. With a unique design that includes a thin-waisted body and chrome hardware, this vintage style will get any kid excited to learn to play the bass.

The Ibanez Talman Bass also uses a jatoba fingerboard, which can be cheaper than rosewood but plays just as well. The maple neck and poplar body make up a great middle-of-the-road bass that won’t cost you much. It uses a single-coil pickup on the bridge and a split pickup on the neck, so you get both smooth and substantial tones for the best of both worlds.

The scale length on this junior bass guitar is 30″, which is two inches longer than some of the other ¾ basses on this list. That might make this a better guitar for young teenagers than for smaller children, who might find it still too long and unmanageable.

Pros

  • One single-coil pickup and one split pickup, giving you a unique textured tone.
  • Great value for high-quality materials.
  • Extremely affordable

Cons

  • Slightly longer neck might be too long for some kids.

G&L Tribute Fallout Short Scale Bass Guitar

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  • Magnetic Field Design humbucking pickup
  • Unique pick plate and vintage style
  • 30" neck that's perfect for older kids
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G&L Tribute Fallout Short Scale Bass Guitar Review

If you’d like a kids’ bass with a distinctive design, the double horns of the Tribute Fallout Short Scale bass and its flared front plate will definitely appeal to them.

This is the most expensive kids’ bass guitar on this list, but this is a high-quality instrument that produces an awesome tone.

It has a three-way pickup selector, so you can quickly switch through your pickup settings of series, split-coil, and parallel modes. This offers your little bass guitarist a lot of versatility without having to deal with any confusing controls.

The G&L Tribute Fallout bass also has a neck length of 30″, so it may be too big for young kids. Make sure you’re only buying a 30″ neck if you’re buying a larger bass.

No matter what kind of music your child likes to play, they can find the right tone for them with this ¾ bass.

Pros

  • Versatile and simple tone-switching controls.
  • Saddle-lock bridge will keep you in tune no matter how hard you pull your strings.
  • High-quality construction; your child may never want to replace this bass!

Cons

  • Only has 19 frets.
  • Most expensive junior bass listed here.

Kids’ Bass Buyer’s Guide

A youth bass guitar should have all the great tonal qualities and tech features that a full-sized bass guitar has. Here are some tips on how you can find the perfect bass for your teen or child.

How To Choose the Best Kids’ Bass

  • Determine how long you want the neck to be. Some necks are around 28″ long, while others are 30″ long. If your child is younger, stick to a kids’ bass guitar that’s 28″. If you have a teenager who probably will stay the same size for a while, consider buying a 30″ bass like the Ibanez TMB30 Bass and the G&L Tribute Fallout bass.
  • Pick a style your kid will love. Even if you want to surprise your child with a brand new bass, you might want to involve them in the process so that they’re sure to love their present.
  • Make sure you’re getting the right amount of frets. Young kids probably won’t be spending much time at the top of the neck, at least at first, so they probably won’t mind a guitar like the Squier Mini Precision Bass or the Gretsch G2220 Junior which only has 20 frets. Young teenagers will probably be missing those two extra three frets.

Why Buy a ¾ Bass for Your Child?

Why should you buy a children’s bass guitar when they will just grow out of it? Wouldn’t it be better to get them a full-sized bass and let them grow into it? There are a few reasons you might want to invest in a ¾ size bass instead of a full-sized one at first.

The main reason is that it can be extremely difficult for someone with little fingers to handle a standard bass guitar. Keep in mind that the strings of a bass guitar are much thicker than on other instruments.

It can be extremely discouraging for kids when they find that certain intervals will be impossible for them to play for a few years. Having a shorter neck will make the frets a little shorter, opening up some of these intervals to them.

Plus, you may not have to replace a ¾ bass at all. Girls who want to learn the bass might find their ¾ bass guitar (like the Ibanez miKro GSRM20) the perfect size for them all through adulthood. Since these smaller-size guitars usually have all the same notes and technology on a full-sized guitar, smaller-sized people might never want to upgrade.

Final Thoughts

If you’re looking for the best bass guitar for kids, you’ll have no trouble finding dozens of great options. Getting the right instrument for your child right off the bat will help to foster a life-long love of playing music. Start looking for your child’s new bass guitar today!

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